Hope in an Envelope: Rach’s Rainy Day Letter

My lovely #PPDchat friend Rach ( on Twitter) was moved by this post on the . I challenged her to actually sid down and write herself one of those letters,  to have on hand when the next setback happened. Below is Rachana’s letter to herself in all its glory. I hope you will be inspired by it as much as I am. 

If you too are in recovery from PPD, I invite you to write your own rainy day letter. Then print it and put it in an envelope you can keep in your purse and/or your bedside table  (having two copies isn’t a bad idea). Read it when you need it. S etbacks, those bastards, are inevitable, yet their severity and frequency will drop over time, and rainy days letters help this happen faster.

W hile it may not make everything better instantly, reading a letter you wrote while you were fully “yourself” does help shut up the PPDemons, or at least make it easier to discredit their accusations. In any case, a rainy day letter is guaranteed to bring a ray of hope into the darkness of a setback, be it a bad day or a bad month.

You see, it’s how we handle a setback that determines how long it will last. If you see every bad day as proof that you are slipping, and if slipping means that you are going to fall deep down into the abyss of depression again, then bad days will wreak much more havoc than if you see setbacks for what they really are: painful yuck which is as normal and inevitable as catching a cold (and what do ya know, they often come together, darn it).

And let’s pretend for a moment that you are slipping: slipping doesn’t have to mean sinking, and even sinking doesn’t mean you are going to drown. In each of these painful situation, having a rainy day letter is like having someone lend you a hand just when you need it, and the beauty of it is that the help comes from you! You! You ! You! Because even when it doesn’t feel this way, you have all the answers inside. Such a big part of recovery from depression is about gaining self-trust. And finding your own power.  A letter to yourself holds all of these things and more.

You are welcome to share your rainy day letter with me, and if you wish, I would be honored to share it here on the blog, where your letter to yourself can help another mama see things to like in herself. 

OK, enough of my words already.  Lets pass the mike to Rach: 

 

– – –

On Rainy Days

Dear Mama,

It’s been a tough year. The past few months have tested and stretched you more than you realized. You didn’t know just how hard being a mother could be. You were lost, wondering how anyone knew how to be a mother. You could barely keep your head above water with middle of the night feedings, endless laundry and dirty diapers. You were caring full-time for 2 people—your baby and yourself.

But you got lost somewhere in the shuffle. It became so overwhelming that you didn’t take care of yourself. You were consumed with worry, guilt, stress, and worst of all, perfection. You wanted to be the best mom, wife and homemaker. But you started to feel like you were failing. And you didn’t know it.

You didn’t realize you were in a slump. You just knew you didn’t feel like yourself. You were angry, sad, and confused at the same time. The lack of sleep, the lack of control was consuming you. You thought this was what your life was destined to be.

Would happiness ever come to you?

I can answer that yes, yes it will come.
Because it did.
Look at these past 7 days.
Seven whole days!!

In these 7 days, look at what was accomplished. You came home to a clean and renovated home. Looking around at this newly remodeled home has made you so happy to be back. The remodel on the house was causing you so much stress and this is now one less thing to worry about.

And look at your little baby. She’s sleeping again! You had to sleep train her, something you weren’t able to do while you were away. But her daddy was on board with the sleep training and together, with lots of prayer, you did it. And guess what? She’s just fine! She’s happier during the day because she’s sleeping well at night.

You’re happier too. You have more energy. You’re eating better. You’re finding time to see friends, do some crafts, and read magazines. Everyone is so much happier.

Keep in mind though, that babies change all the time. You might have solved one issue today, but there will be something different tomorrow. Don’t be discouraged. Nothing is permanent. You know that now. Yes, hard and challenging times may be ahead, but you know how to swim now. But you also know that sometimes you can just tread water and wait for a life raft to come. Just send out an S.O.S. and you’ll have a whole slew of friends and family who love you come to the rescue. Just ask.

You’re doing great, Mama. Everyone is healthy. Everyone is happy. This is the life you’ve always wanted. Everyone has good days and bad days. The bad days can make you stronger and more appreciative of the good. The ways you manage the momentum and relationships is also assessed in https://buyresearchpapers.net/ the work. You’ve fought hard. You may have to fight again. But you can triumph. Because today, you have.

 

– – –

Such a great letter, Rach. Thank you so very much for sharing it with us.

Rach bloggs at  
Go say hello, and tell her I sent  you…

Comment magic:
Talk to Rach, talk to me, talk to you.
Tell Rach what parts of her letter touched you.
Tell me: what do you need to hear when you are down? 

Tell you: what do you love about you most? How can that help you feel better when you are in a slump?

As always, oodles of love to all who read.
Whether you comment or not, may the joy be with you.

Sorry, comments are closed for this post.

Hope in an Envelope: Rach’s Rainy Day Letter

My lovely #PPDchat friend Rach ( on Twitter) was moved by this post on the . I challenged her to actually sid down and write herself one of those letters,  to have on hand when the next setback happened. Below is Rachana’s letter to herself in all its glory. I hope you will be inspired by it as much as I am. 

If you too are in recovery from PPD, I invite you to write your own rainy day letter. Then print it and put it in an envelope you can keep in your purse and/or your bedside table  (having two copies isn’t a bad idea). Read it when you need it. S etbacks, those bastards, are inevitable, yet their severity and frequency will drop over time, and rainy days letters help this happen faster.

W hile it may not make everything better instantly, reading a letter you wrote while you were fully “yourself” does help shut up the PPDemons, or at least make it easier to discredit their accusations. In any case, a rainy day letter is guaranteed to bring a ray of hope into the darkness of a setback, be it a bad day or a bad month.

You see, it’s how we handle a setback that determines how long it will last. If you see every bad day as proof that you are slipping, and if slipping means that you are going to fall deep down into the abyss of depression again, then bad days will wreak much more havoc than if you see setbacks for what they really are: painful yuck which is as normal and inevitable as catching a cold (and what do ya know, they often come together, darn it).

And let’s pretend for a moment that you are slipping: slipping doesn’t have to mean sinking, and even sinking doesn’t mean you are going to drown. In each of these painful situation, having a rainy day letter is like having someone lend you a hand just when you need it, and the beauty of it is that the help comes from you! You! You ! You! Because even when it doesn’t feel this way, you have all the answers inside. Such a big part of recovery from depression is about gaining self-trust. And finding your own power.  A letter to yourself holds all of these things and more.

You are welcome to share your rainy day letter with me, and if you wish, I would be honored to share it here on the blog, where your letter to yourself can help another mama see things to like in herself. 

OK, enough of my words already.  Lets pass the mike to Rach: 

 

– – –

On Rainy Days

Dear Mama,

It’s been a tough year. The past few months have tested and stretched you more than you realized. You didn’t know just how hard being a mother could be. You were lost, wondering how anyone knew how to be a mother. You could barely keep your head above water with middle of the night feedings, endless laundry and dirty diapers. You were caring full-time for 2 people—your baby and yourself.

But you got lost somewhere in the shuffle. It became so overwhelming that you didn’t take care of yourself. You were consumed with worry, guilt, stress, and worst of all, perfection. You wanted to be the best mom, wife and homemaker. But you started to feel like you were failing. And you didn’t know it.

You didn’t realize you were in a slump. You just knew you didn’t feel like yourself. You were angry, sad, and confused at the same time. The lack of sleep, the lack of control was consuming you. You thought this was what your life was destined to be.

Would happiness ever come to you?

I can answer that yes, yes it will come.
Because it did.
Look at these past 7 days.
Seven whole days!!

In these 7 days, look at what was accomplished. You came home to a clean and renovated home. Looking around at this newly remodeled home has made you so happy to be back. The remodel on the house was causing you so much stress and this is now one less thing to worry about.

And look at your little baby. She’s sleeping again! You had to sleep train her, something you weren’t able to do while you were away. But her daddy was on board with the sleep training and together, with lots of prayer, you did it. And guess what? She’s just fine! She’s happier during the day because she’s sleeping well at night.

You’re happier too. You have more energy. You’re eating better. You’re finding time to see friends, do some crafts, and read magazines. Everyone is so much happier.

Keep in mind though, that babies change all the time. You might have solved one issue today, but there will be something different tomorrow. Don’t be discouraged. Nothing is permanent. You know that now. Yes, hard and challenging times may be ahead, but you know how to swim now. But you also know that sometimes you can just tread water and wait for a life raft to come. Just send out an S.O.S. and you’ll have a whole slew of friends and family who love you come to the rescue. Just ask.

You’re doing great, Mama. Everyone is healthy. Everyone is happy. This is the life you’ve always wanted. Everyone has good days and bad days. The bad days can make you stronger and more appreciative of the good. The ways you manage the momentum and relationships is also assessed in https://buyresearchpapers.net/ the work. You’ve fought hard. You may have to fight again. But you can triumph. Because today, you have.

 

– – –

Such a great letter, Rach. Thank you so very much for sharing it with us.

Rach bloggs at  
Go say hello, and tell her I sent  you…

Comment magic:
Talk to Rach, talk to me, talk to you.
Tell Rach what parts of her letter touched you.
Tell me: what do you need to hear when you are down? 

Tell you: what do you love about you most? How can that help you feel better when you are in a slump?

As always, oodles of love to all who read.
Whether you comment or not, may the joy be with you.

Sorry, comments are closed for this post.